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Virtual PC 2007 Sound Card Emulator Installation (Sound Blaster 16)

September 2, 2008 Leave a comment

I have a series of applications I needed to test audio, namely Microsoft Live Meeting 2007 (Audio\Video).  However, as most of you know, audio drivers or emulators are not installed by default with Microsoft Virtual PC 2007.  In order to get it to work on Windows Server 2003, you must copy two files off of a Windows XP cd and place them on the virtualized system.  The two driver files you need are wdma_ctl.inf and ctlsb16.sys.   I want to note that this does not work for Virtual Server 2005, only Virtual PC 2007.

Here are the steps:

From a command prompt on a Windows XP system, run this command:

"%windir%\driver cache\i386\driver.cab" -F:ctlsb16.sys c:\

This will extract the ctlsb16.sys to your root c:\.  If it does not, from the extracted CAB driver window that popped up, copy the ctlsb16.sys file manually to the root of C:\.

The wdma_ctl.inf file is also located at C:\WINDOWS\inf folder on the Windows XP system.

Copy these two files over to the Virtual PC.  From the Device Manager on the Virtual PC instance, perform a Have Disk during the device installation and direct the install to *.inf file you copied over.  Reboot the workstation as necessary.  You may have to enable the sound device from the control panel after the server is booted.  You may also want to place an audio icon on the task bar….which is also done from the control panel. 

Ed McKinzie

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Connecting a Virtual Server 2005 R2 Host with its Virtual Machines using Microsoft’s Loop Back Adapter

November 14, 2007 Leave a comment

The Virtual Server 2005 R2 network architecture was designed to allow default isolation of virtual machine network traffic from other virtual machines, the Virtual Server host, and external networks. However, using the Microsoft Loop Back Adapter, you can configure virtual machines to be connected to each other, the Virtual Server host, corporate networks, or the Internet.

The Microsoft Loop Back Adapter is a built-in, software-based network interface. When you use it, network traffic between connected virtual machines and the Virtual Server host is constrained to the internal virtual network, remaining isolated from external, physical networks.

The networking capabilities of Virtual Server 2005 can be extended with Microsoft Loop Back Adapter. Using the Microsoft Loop Back Adapter, you can:  (Microsoft Documentation Here)

  1. Use Internet Connection Firewall (ICF) to protect virtual networks. ICF checks all communications that cross the connection between your virtual network and the Internet and is selective about which responses from the Internet it allows.
  2. Provide host-to-guest networking and file sharing without having to use an external network.
  3. Use Internet Connection Sharing to provide Network Address Translation (NAT) and share a single connection to the Internet between the host operating system and one or more virtual machines.

To install the Microsoft Loopback Adapter

Perform this step on the host operating system.

  1. Click on Start –> Settings –> Control Panel and Select "Add Hardware".  Click Next, Click "Yes, I have already connected the hardware", Click Next.
  2. Scroll to the bottom, select "Add a new Hardware device".  Click Next.   Select "Install the hardware"
  3. Select "Network Adapter".  Click Next.   Select "Microsoft", the Select "Microsoft Loopback Adapter"
  4. Click Next and Finish.

Configure the Microsoft Loopback Adapter to communicate with the Virtual Environment.

Launch the Virtual Server Administration Website.  On the Virtual Network section, create a new Virtual Network.  Name it LoopBack Adapter and select the Microsoft Loopback Adapter from the drop down list.  Click OK. 

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Go back to the Virtual Network section and Select Configure –> Microsoft Loopback Adapter.  Enable which Virtual Servers you want to use this connection and Click OK.

Configure host-to-guest networking and file sharing

  1. On the host operating system, open Network Connections, right-click the local area connection for Microsoft Loopback Adapter, and then select Properties.  (Or Start –> Settings –> Control Panel –> Network Connections)
  2. In the Microsoft Loopback Adapter Properties dialog box, verify that the Virtual Machine Network services check box is selected.
  3. Click Internet Protocol (TCP/IP), and then click Properties.
  4. On the General tab, click Use the following IP address, and then type the IP address and subnet mask (such as 192.168.0.1 and 255.255.255.0).

 

Important    You can use any Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) address, but it is best to choose one from a reserved range of non-routable TCP/IP addresses. For example, TCP/IP addresses of the form 192.168.x.y, where x is a value from 0 through 255 and y is a value from 1 through 254, are non-routable. The value you choose for x must be the same on the host operating system and each guest operating system that is to be part of this virtual network. If your primary Ethernet connection uses one of these non-routable addresses, you must choose a different value for x to assign to Microsoft Loopback Adapter.

Click OK, and then click Close.

Configure the Guest TCP\IP settings

On the guest or virtual operating system, open Network Connections, right-click the local area connection and then select Properties.  (Or Start –> Settings –> Control Panel –> Network Connections)

Click Internet Protocol (TCP/IP), and then click Properties.

On the General tab, click Use the following IP address, and then type the IP address and subnet mask (such as 192.168.0.10 and 255.255.255.0).  Note: The Default gateway must be set as the Host operating system’s Microsoft Loopback adapter’s IP address.  Also, the Subnet Mask must match the Host operating system’s Microsoft Loopback adapter network settings.  Here I am pointing the server at itself for DNS, because it is also a Domain Controller running DNS services.

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Happy Hunting.

Ed McKinzie